Weekly Market Notes – June 26, 2017

Weekly_Market_Notes

For the Week of June 26, 2017

The Markets

Gains in tech and energy stocks offset financial sector weakness to help Wall Street close higher Friday. Coming off highs, the S&P 500 and NASDAQ closed in the green while the Dow Jones closed slightly down. For the week, the Dow rose 0.05 to close at 21,394.76. The S&P gained 0.22 percent to finish at 2,438.30, and the NASDAQ climbed 1.84 percent to end the week at 6,256.25.

Returns Through 6/23/17 1 Week YTD 1 Year 3 Year 5 Year
Dow Jones Industrials (TR) 0.05 9.58 21.84 10.85 13.93
NASDAQ Composite (PR) 1.84 16.39 27.60 12.77 16.72
S&P 500 (TR) 0.22 9.98 17.81 9.80 15.24
Barclays US Agg Bond (TR) 0.17 2.86 1.38 2.85 2.35
MSCI EAFE (TR) -0.18 14.11 15.04 1.12 9.44

Source: Morningstar.com. *Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Indexes are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Three- and five-year returns are annualized. The Dow Jones Industrials, MSCI EAFE, Barclays US Agg Bond and S&P, excluding “1 Week” returns, are based on total return, which is a reflection of return to an investor by reinvesting dividends after the deduction of withholding tax. The NASDAQ is based on price return, which is the capital appreciation of the portfolio, excluding income generated by the assets in the portfolio in the form of interest and dividends. (TR) indicates total return. (PR) indicates price return. MSCI EAFE returns stated in U.S. dollars.

 

Impact? — June’s federal rate hike was the Fed’s fourth in its current rate hike cycle. In the 18 months since its first rate hike on Dec. 16, 2015 (i.e., Dec. 16, 2015, to last Friday, June 16), the S&P 500 has gained 21.2 percent (total return), and the yield on the 10-year Treasury note has fallen from 2.30 percent to 2.15 percent (source: BTN Research).

Too Risky? — Of 18,336 adults surveyed in April 2017, just 54 percent own stocks (direct ownership or indirectly owned through a pooled investment) in their personal accounts or pre-tax retirement accounts (source: Gallup, BTN Research).

Back Working Again — During the global real estate recession that began in 2008, our national jobless rate peaked at 10 percent in October 2009, representing 15.4 million out-of-work Americans. The May 2017 jobless rate of 4.3 percent equates to 6.9 million individuals lacking employment (source: Department of Labor, BTN Research).

 

WEEKLY FOCUS – Nearing Retirement? What to Do With Your 401(k)

A major decision you’ll face as you near retirement is what you should do about your company-sponsored savings plan. Retiring employees with company-sponsored 401k plans have basically three options: take the money and run, leave it as is or roll the funds over.

Take the money and run. If you accept a cash lump sum, you’ll be responsible for making the money last throughout your retirement. Managing your money on your own will require your full attention and discipline. You’ll have to pay all taxes and penalties, and any investments you make will be subject to market fluctuation. That could increase or decrease the value of the assets and any income they generate. If you don’t roll the funds into an IRA, the distribution will be taxed as ordinary income, which could put you into a higher tax bracket.

Leave it as is. Just because you’re retiring doesn’t mean you have to leave your 401(k) right away. If the plan is low cost and includes good investments, you might want to keep your money right where it is for a while. If you have at least $5,000 invested, the plan administrator is required to maintain it. You can take qualified distributions or continue to let it grow undisturbed until distributions are required by the plan or the IRS deadline (the first of April following the year you turn 70.5). Even if you take payments, the remainder of the investment continues to earn. You may eventually want to roll it over to a Roth IRA or traditional IRA, but this approach gives you time to consider all of your options.

Rollover, Beethoven. If you have several retirement accounts from different jobs, managing them can be a nightmare. This may be a good reason to consolidate the accounts into a single IRA or Roth IRA. An IRA may provide greater control over the investments. You may find that it gives you more control over distributions, as well. Another good reason: you may want to continue investing in your retirement account. A Roth IRA allows you to contribute as long as you’re earning income and fall within income guidelines. Not so in a traditional IRA, which prohibits contributions after age 70.5.

You’ve spent your career investing in your company-sponsored savings plan. What you do with the money is a major financial decision. Call our office – we can help you make the choice that’s best for you.

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*The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Morgan Stanley Capital International Europe, Australia and Far East Index (MSCI EAFE Index) is a widely recognized benchmark of non-U.S. stock markets. It is an unmanaged index composed of a sample of companies representative of the market structure of 20 European and Pacific Basin countries and includes reinvestment of all dividends. Barclays Capital Aggregate Bond Index is an unmanaged index comprised of U.S. investment-grade, fixed-rate bond market securities, including government, government agency, corporate and mortgage-backed securities between one and 10 years. Written by Securities America, Copyright June 2017. All rights reserved. Securities offered through Securities America, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. SAI# 1828992.1

Weekly Market Notes – June 19, 2017

Weekly_Market_Notes

For the Week of June 19, 2017

The Markets

Amazon’s deal to buy Whole Foods stirred Wall Street Friday, rocking shares of a range of retail companies, including Wal-Mart, Target, Costco and Walgreen Boots, while Amazon and Whole Foods’ stock surged. The NASDAQ declined; the S&P finished slightly higher; and the Dow Industrials set a record close. For the week, the Dow rose 0.59 to close at 21,384.28. The S&P gained 0.12 percent to finish at 2,433.15, and the NASDAQ fell 0.92 percent to end the week at 6,151.76.

Returns Through 6/16/17 1 Week YTD 1 Year 3 Year 5 Year
Dow Jones Industrials (TR) 0.59 9.52 23.69 11.18 13.69
NASDAQ Composite (PR) -0.92 14.27 26.96 12.49 16.45
S&P 500 (TR) 0.12 9.74 19.56 10.19 15.06
Barclays US Agg Bond (TR) 0.26 2.69 0.61 2.79 2.29
MSCI EAFE (TR) 0.02 14.31 23.97 1.47 9.55

Source: Morningstar.com. *Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Indexes are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Three- and five-year returns are annualized. The Dow Jones Industrials, MSCI EAFE, Barclays US Agg Bond and S&P, excluding “1 Week” returns, are based on total return, which is a reflection of return to an investor by reinvesting dividends after the deduction of withholding tax. The NASDAQ is based on price return, which is the capital appreciation of the portfolio, excluding income generated by the assets in the portfolio in the form of interest and dividends. (TR) indicates total return. (PR) indicates price return. MSCI EAFE returns stated in U.S. dollars.

 

Good Results Lately — The S&P 500 was down on a total return basis in 9 of the 13 years from 1929-1941. The S&P 500 has been down on a total return basis in just 1 of the last 14 years from 2003-2016, i.e., down in calendar year 2008 (source: BTN Research).

Not Worth It — Of millennials who have student debt, 23 percent believe the college education they received “will never be worth” the debt they incurred. Millennials are defined as the 75 million Americans ages 20-36 in 2017, i.e., individuals born from 1981-1997 (source: TD Ameritrade, BTN Research).

Required Help — Six banks have failed this year through Friday, June 9. Five banks failed in all of 2016. In 2010, 157 banks failed (source: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, BTN Research).

 

WEEKLY FOCUS – Famous Fathers as Financial Role Models

Fathers teach us to honor commitments, stand by friends and serve those we love. They also pass on financial attitudes and education, as the following well-known dads illustrate.

Business magnate and former politician H. Ross Perot taught his young children self-discipline by providing a small allowance. A reporter once asked Ross Perot Jr. how it felt to be the son of the richest man in Texas.

“Mister, all I know is I get 25 cents a week,” said Perot Jr., who recently reflected that his father motivated by showing he cared.

“Kids have to know you’ve made them your No. 1 priority,” said Perot. “Even when Dad was busy traveling around the country on business, he would fly back to see us if we were in a school play. He always made sure we knew how special we were to him.”

At 12, future actor Matt Damon started sending part of his allowance to one of his mother’s favorite causes. Now a powerhouse in philanthropic circles and founder of a safe water initiative and a humanitarian aid organization, he hopes to pass his passion for philanthropy on to his children.

Screen star Matthew McConaughey demonstrated the importance of taking some short-term risks to accomplish a long-term strategy by turning down some big paychecks for movies he didn’t think would strengthen his career. The plan eventually paid off; he’s now reported to be worth $95 million.

Throughout their lives, the two richest men in the world, Bill Gates ($89 billion) and Warren Buffet ($76.8 billion), have modeled a passion for work and support for charitable causes. They have also been transparent with their children regarding future inheritance. Both plan to leave the bulk of their estates to charity. Buffet explained why:

“I still believe in the philosophy,” he said, “…that a very rich person should give his kids enough to do anything but not enough to do nothing.”

Good fathers provide for their families. Great fathers provide examples and lessons to equip their loved ones to live productive, secure and meaningful lives. If you’d like help teaching your children or grandchildren the importance of saving, investing and sharing, contact our office today.

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* The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Morgan Stanley Capital International Europe, Australia and Far East Index (MSCI EAFE Index) is a widely recognized benchmark of non-U.S. stock markets. It is an unmanaged index composed of a sample of companies representative of the market structure of 20 European and Pacific Basin countries and includes reinvestment of all dividends. Barclays Capital Aggregate Bond Index is an unmanaged index comprised of U.S. investment-grade, fixed-rate bond market securities, including government, government agency, corporate and mortgage-backed securities between one and 10 years. Written by Securities America, Copyright June 2017. All rights reserved. Securities offered through Securities America, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. SAI# 1823877.1

Weekly Market Notes – June 12, 2017

Weekly_Market_Notes

For the Week of June 12, 2017

The Markets

After touching an all-time high Friday morning, the NASDAQ saw its worst daily decline for the year as technology stocks sold off sharply. The Dow Jones Industrial Average held onto modest gains to end at an all-time high. For the week, the Dow rose 0.33 percent to close at 21,271.97. The S&P fell 0.27 percent to finish at 2,431.77, and the NASDAQ lost 1.55 percent to end the week at 6,207.92.

Returns Through 6/9/17 1 Week YTD 1 Year 3 Year 5 Year
Dow Jones Industrials (TR) 0.33 8.89 21.32 10.62 13.96
NASDAQ Composite (PR) -1.55 15.32 25.19 12.71 16.78
S&P 500 (TR) -0.27 9.61 17.38 9.91 15.34
Barclays US Agg Bond (TR) -0.15 2.42 0.76 2.74 2.30
MSCI EAFE (TR) -1.17 14.29 16.08 1.29 10.05

Source: Morningstar.com. *Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Indexes are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Three- and five-year returns are annualized. The Dow Jones Industrials, MSCI EAFE, Barclays US Agg Bond and S&P, excluding “1 Week” returns, are based on total return, which is a reflection of return to an investor by reinvesting dividends after the deduction of withholding tax. The NASDAQ is based on price return, which is the capital appreciation of the portfolio, excluding income generated by the assets in the portfolio in the form of interest and dividends. (TR) indicates total return. (PR) indicates price return. MSCI EAFE returns stated in U.S. dollars.

 

The Really Rich — The top 0.1 percent of U.S. taxpayers (i.e., top one out of every 1,000 taxpayers) paid 19.9 percent of all federal income tax for the 2014 tax year (source: Internal Revenue Service, BTN Research).

No Recession Here — The current economic expansion in the U.S. will reach eight years in length on June 30. No expansion in history has lasted longer than 10 years based on data tracked since 1854 (source: National Bureau of Economic Research, BTN Research).

 They Cut Back, We Increased — U.S. oil producers increased their field production of crude oil by 645,000 barrels a day (to 9.34 million barrels per day) over the six months from Nov. 30, 2016, to May 31. The increased output was in response to a 1.8 million barrel per day cutback announced by 24 oil producing countries on Nov. 30, 2016 (source: Department of Energy, BTN Research).

 

WEEKLY FOCUS – Elder Abuse Awareness Includes Financial Crimes

June 15 each year is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, which focuses on elder abuse of all types. Although physical or emotional abuse may come immediately to mind, in 2014 criminals targeted some 3.2 million Americans for elder financial abuse. Why target seniors? As famed bank robber Willie Sutton put it – “because that’s where the money is.”

By this point in life, most investors have passed the wealth accumulation phase and entered the wealth management stage. This is also when many of us begin to see a decline in physical health and mental cognition.

Elders in the U.S. lose some $2.9 billion each year to financial abuse, and the number of potential victims is rising. Reported cases have soared over the past few years as the U.S. shifts demographically to an older population. Some 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 each day, a trend that will continue for the next 10-15 years. By 2040, there could be 80 million Americans, nearly 20 percent of the overall population, who will be 65 or older. If you have a senior in your life, now or in the future, there’s a chance you or someone you love will be at risk.

Who targets elders for financial abuse? Many cases involve strangers or acquaintances. But all too often the perpetrators are familiar faces belonging to neighbors, friends – even family members. Some well-known scams include Medicare fraud, bogus charity solicitations, romance scams and winning prizes or sweepstakes. But there are more mundane abuses, such as theft of checks or valuables.

What can you do to protect your loved one’s financial security? Know the risks and signs of elder financial abuse. Be a regular presence in their lives, as solitary elders are especially at risk. Although finances can be difficult to talk about, it may be necessary to have that discussion. You could suggest hiring a neutral third party to monitor finances, an automatic bill payment service, a financial power of attorney or a revocable trust with a corporate trustee. Encourage them to involve their financial team in the discussions.

Once you’ve taken steps to safeguard your elder loved one’s finances, take the time to review your own. To find out more about common scams or how to spot elder financial abuse, call our office. We can help you plan ahead to protect your own assets and make sure your wishes are carried out.

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*The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Morgan Stanley Capital International Europe, Australia and Far East Index (MSCI EAFE Index) is a widely recognized benchmark of non-U.S. stock markets. It is an unmanaged index composed of a sample of companies representative of the market structure of 20 European and Pacific Basin countries and includes reinvestment of all dividends. Barclays Capital Aggregate Bond Index is an unmanaged index comprised of U.S. investment-grade, fixed-rate bond market securities, including government, government agency, corporate and mortgage-backed securities between one and 10 years. Written by Securities America, Copyright June 2017. All rights reserved. Securities offered through Securities America, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. SAI# 1818454.1

June Is Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month

Caring for a Family Member With Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s is one of our nation’s costliest diseases. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, total health care, long-term care and hospice payments related to Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias will total $236 billion in 2016. Sadly, afflicted individuals without adequate long-term care insurance frequently lose most, if not all, of their financial assets.

But even dementias’ beginning stages and mild cognitive impairment experienced by healthy seniors can put personal wealth at risk. That’s why it’s important to begin having conversations about your aging family member’s finances well before you see signs of mental decline. Obviously, this has to be done with great sensitivity and respect. Make sure they know you don’t want to take control, but you would like to ensure they are protected and their wishes honored in the years to come.

During ongoing dialogs, try to learn what you’ll need to know if it becomes necessary to manage their finances: the names and contact information of their financial planner, accountant and attorney; financial records and where they are kept; their monthly income and the sources; insurance policies; the location of financial accounts; regular bills and how they are paid; and log-in information for online accounts.

Suggest meeting jointly with their financial advisor and/or other family members. Gain an understanding of their priorities. Ask which assets are most important to them, which causes they want to support and whether their will is up-to-date.

Propose having legal documents created that will allow you or another family member to make decisions if your loved one becomes unable to. This can include: a health care power of attorney (POA) or a more limited living will, either a limited or durable power of attorney for finances, an authorization to disclose account information and a form authorizing a financial institution to contact you if concerns arise about their ability to manage finances. Not having these documents when they’re needed can make helping your elderly relative considerably more difficult. For example, without a POA, you may need to go to court to attain guardianship of your family member to access accounts on their behalf.

Contact us at 973-771-5120 or via email at info@mywealthdirection.com for more information on protecting your loved one or how create a plan to care for them.

Weekly Market Notes – June 5, 2017

Weekly_Market_Notes

For the Week of June 5, 2017

The Markets

Despite May’s weak jobs report and revised, lower jobs numbers for March and April, all three major indexes closed at records Friday. Technology and industrial stock gains led the increase. For the week, the Dow rose 0.69 to close at 21,206.29. The S&P gained 1.01 percent to finish at 2,439.07, and the NASDAQ climbed 1.54 percent to end the week at 6,305.80.

Returns Through 6/02/17 1 Week YTD 1 Year 3 Year 5 Year
Dow Jones Industrials (TR) 0.69 8.52 21.94 10.95 14.70
NASDAQ Composite (PR) 1.54 17.14 26.84 14.17 18.08
S&P 500 (TR) 1.01 9.91 18.31 10.52 16.26
Barclays US Agg Bond (TR) 0.49 2.57 1.66 2.71 2.22
MSCI EAFE (TR) 1.73 15.64 19.12 1.95 10.87

Source: Morningstar.com. *Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Indexes are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly. Three- and five-year returns are annualized. The Dow Jones Industrials, MSCI EAFE, Barclays US Agg Bond and S&P, excluding “1 Week” returns, are based on total return, which is a reflection of return to an investor by reinvesting dividends after the deduction of withholding tax. The NASDAQ is based on price return, which is the capital appreciation of the portfolio, excluding income generated by the assets in the portfolio in the form of interest and dividends. (TR) indicates total return. (PR) indicates price return. MSCI EAFE returns stated in U.S. dollars.

They Are Not Done Yet — Between now and the end of 2018, the Federal Reserve has 13 scheduled meetings. The median estimate of Federal Open Market Committee policymakers suggests five separate rate hikes of 0.25 percent each will occur by Dec. 31, 2018. The next Fed meeting is June 13-14 (source: Federal Reserve, BTN Research).

 Breakeven — The three summer months (June, July and August) have produced an average loss of 0.1 percent (total return) for the S&P 500 stock index over the last 25 years, i.e., 1992-2016 (source: BTN Research).

 Too Pessimistic — An annual survey of Americans 65 or older gave the U.S. stock market at least a 50 percent chance of rising in the upcoming year only one time over 12 surveys conducted from 2002-2013. The U.S. stock market (as measured by the S&P 500) was actually up 10 of the 12 years (down in 2002 and 2008), gaining 105 percent (total return), an average of 6.2 percent per year (source: University of Michigan, BTN Research).

 

WEEKLY FOCUS – Protect Your Finances on Vacation

Don’t let money problems ruin a vacation designed to be relaxing and rejuvenating. Ensure your next trip is a positive getaway by minimizing financial risks or issues with these simple steps:

Plan ahead. Pay your bills in advance or set up automatic payments while you’re away. Bring at least two credit cards; make sure they don’t expire soon. Notify your card issuers of upcoming travel – especially outside the country. Unless you’re sure your bank has ATMs at your destination, determine the minimal amount of cash you may need to carry.

Limit loss. Pay for travel costs with a credit card that has built-in protections, such as auto rental collision coverage, purchase protection, trip cancellation insurance and lost luggage insurance. Make duplicate copies of your passport, credit cards, tickets and itinerary. Leave one set with a friend or relative at home and keep one set separate from originals while traveling. Don’t keep all of your cash and credit cards in the same place. Place a sheet of paper with your basic contact information inside your suitcase and document contents by taking a photo in case it is lost or stolen. If possible, stay in a hotel with room safes and hallway security cameras. But realize hotel safes are not foolproof. In fact, there are locking devices available online to make them more secure.

Guard your identity. Ask the post office to hold mail to eliminate a tell-tale sign you’re away and keep sensitive information more secure. If you make luggage tags, be careful what information you include. Avoid using a home phone number, which allows criminals to do a reverse lookup to get your street address. Instead, use a work phone number or a separate email address dedicated for travel. Turn on text or email alerts notifying you of every credit card transaction. If you need to access banking information, use an Ethernet cable in your hotel room or log in via a cellular network, which is safer than a Wi-Fi connection. Keep your phone with you and secure it with a password, auto-lock and remote tracking or disabling.

Has anything changed in your life that could affect your financial well-being? Call our office for a comprehensive review that includes identifying potential risks and evaluates how to protect against them.

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* The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Morgan Stanley Capital International Europe, Australia and Far East Index (MSCI EAFE Index) is a widely recognized benchmark of non-U.S. stock markets. It is an unmanaged index composed of a sample of companies representative of the market structure of 20 European and Pacific Basin countries and includes reinvestment of all dividends. Barclays Capital Aggregate Bond Index is an unmanaged index comprised of U.S. investment-grade, fixed-rate bond market securities, including government, government agency, corporate and mortgage-backed securities between one and 10 years. Written by Securities America, Copyright June 2017. All rights reserved. Securities offered through Securities America, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. SAI# 1812832.1

June 2017 Monthly Outlook – ‘June Swoon’?

People on Wall Street love to come up with catchy phrases for investing themes.  Last month was ‘sell in May and go away’.  Now I’m seeing ‘June Swoon’.  This is based on the historical trend that June is, on average, a flattish month and the fourth worst in terms of S&P 500 performance.  June also marks the start of the weak summer season for equities. September is historically the worst month and August the second worst, followed by February for equities.

I anticipate the financial markets will be stuck in range through the summer, with equities potentially grinding slowly higher. Corporation earnings were quite strong for the 1st quarter of 2017.  Additionally, companies reported stable or improving outlook for the balance of the year. That should support the equity markets.  Having said that, the current environment is not without risks.  One concern is that the bulk of the gains in stocks year-to-date have come from 2 sectors, Utilities and Technology.  I would be more confident if more sectors, specifically financials,  were showing similar gains. The other area I am watching is the bond market.  Despite equities hitting all-time highs, the bond market is not as enthusiastic with the yield on the 10 yr US Treasury declining to a y-t-d low of 2.15% on 6/2/17.  Lower yields reflect increased buying of bonds. Bonds are viewed as safer investments than stocks,  so when bonds are being bought, it is generally an indication of concern from market participants. There are also political risks – Russia investigation, healthcare and tax reform, Federal Reserve increasing interest rates – that the stock market has mostly ignored so far.  Despite these risks, I anticipate any pull-backs to be short and shallow.

I am also watching the economy closely.  The May 2017 jobs report came in below expectation.  There have been weaker reports on housing and auto sales recently. However, the 2nd estimate of 1st quarter GDP growth was revised up from 0.7% to 1.2% based on better consumer spending and business investment.  Frankly, it is too soon to tell if the recent data reflects merely a pause in what has been one of the longest, albeit slowest, economic recoveries in history or the start of a worrisome trend.  The chart below, courtesy of Raymond James & Associates, shows only 2 negative growth quarters since 2010. Presently, I don’t see any signs that would lead to a recession.

6.2.2017_MONTHLY_OUTLOOK_CHART

As always, I will let you know if any changes to your financial plan or portfolio are in order.  Feel free to call me with any questions or concerns.

 

June Calendar of Events   (comments and additions for future months are always welcome)

  • June is LGBT Pride Month.  Let’s all work towards acceptance and inclusion of people regardless of their sexual orientation.
  • June is also National Safety month.  Schools are closing for summer and folks will be outside more so be mindful on the roads. Perhaps take a first aid or CPR course.

 

June 14th         Flag Day                  

June 19th         Father’s Day  – wishing all father’s, grandfathers, and great grandfathers a wonderful day.

June 20th         Summer begins – let’s see what Mother Nature has in store for us                   

I hope you find this report useful.  Please share it with anyone who you feel would benefit from the information.

 

 

Sources: Raymond James & Associates, CNBC.com